did-you-kno:

 Source
@2 weeks ago with 4131 notes

caitercates:

semi-okayish-vibes:

casualdorkpatrol:

florida-project:

Jazz for Cows

this is the best thing i have ever seen

THIS IS SO IMPORTANT

Jazz for your cow

Jazz for YOU jazz for your COW

image

(via gaypocalypse)

@2 weeks ago with 48438 notes
dollyammarportfolio:

Corot’s “Interrupted Reading” (reinterpretation) Op. 11 (detail)
20” x 20”
Oil on canvas

dollyammarportfolio:

Corot’s “Interrupted Reading” (reinterpretation) Op. 11 (detail)

20” x 20”

Oil on canvas

@2 weeks ago with 271 notes
did-you-kno:

Source
@3 weeks ago with 14487 notes

"The problem is not that poor countries cannot manage to drag themselves up the development ladder, the problem is that they are actively prevented from doing so. Beginning in the early 1980s, Western governments and financial institutions like the World Bank and IMF changed their development policy from one that was basically Keynesian to one that remains devotedly neoliberal, requiring radical market deregulation, fiscal austerity, and privatization in developing countries as a condition of receiving aid.

We were told that this neoliberal shock therapy – known as structural adjustment – would help stimulate the economies of poor countries. But exactly the opposite happened. Instead of helping poor countries develop, structural adjustment basically destroyed them. Cambridge economist Ha-Joon Chang has demonstrated that while developing countries enjoyed per capita income growth of more than 3% prior to the 1980s, structural adjustment cut it in half, down to 1.7%. When it was foisted on Sub-Saharan Africa, per capita income began to decline at a rate of 0.7% per year, and average GNP shrank by around 10%. As a result, the number of Africans living in basic poverty nearly doubled. It would be hard to overstate the degree of human suffering that these figures represent.

Robert Pollin, an economist at the University of Massachusetts, estimates that developing countries have lost roughly $480 billion in potential GDP as a result of structural adjustment. Yet Western corporations have benefitted tremendously. It has forced open vast new consumer markets; it has made it easier to access cheap labor and raw materials; it has opened up avenues for capital flight and tax avoidance; it has created a lucrative market in foreign debt; and it has facilitated a massive transfer of public resources into private hands (the World Bank alone has privatized more than $2 trillion worth of assets in developing countries).

Poverty in the Global South is not just a static given; it is being actively created. And the striking thing is that these atrocities are being perpetrated under the cover of aid. In other words, not only does aid serve as a powerful rhetorical device that cloaks takers in the guise of givers, it also operates as a powerful tool in the global wealth extraction system."

Aid in Reverse: How Poor Countries Develop Rich Countries (via medhanena)

Ummm this is amazingly concisely said.

(via popthirdworld)

(Source: rs620, via mlle-annetoinette)

@3 weeks ago with 1145 notes
muhfuckanevalovedus:

Say it ain’t so Snoop :/


no. way.

muhfuckanevalovedus:

Say it ain’t so Snoop :/

no. way.

(Source: epic-humor, via samanticshift)

@3 weeks ago with 99445 notes

(Source: hi-net, via xaninos)

@3 weeks ago with 3375 notes
did-you-kno:

Source
@3 weeks ago with 25358 notes
did-you-kno:

Source
@2 weeks ago with 8391 notes
dollyammarportfolio:

Corot’s “Interrupted Reading” (reinterpretation) Op. 11
20” x 20”
oil on canvas

dollyammarportfolio:

Corot’s “Interrupted Reading” (reinterpretation) Op. 11

20” x 20”

oil on canvas

@2 weeks ago with 132 notes

Protip: If You’re Gonna Condemn Ableism, Do Not Use The Word “Mouthbreather”

(Source: feministrocker)

@2 weeks ago with 3 notes

douhgnut:

why get a job when you can sell oregano to middle-schoolers and tell them it’s weed

(via queerhawkeye)

@3 weeks ago with 102443 notes
did-you-kno:

Source
@3 weeks ago with 7341 notes
did-you-kno:

Source
@3 weeks ago with 6942 notes

"

One of the most troubling things about the AIDS epidemic is that it could have been stopped so easily by rolling out life-saving antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) early on. Not only do ARVs prevent HIV from developing into AIDS, they also reduce transmission rates and increase people’s willingness to get tested.

But Western pharmaceutical corporations have colluded in pricing these essential drugs way out of reach of the poor. When they were first introduced, patented ARVs cost up to $15,000 per yearly regimen. Generic producers were able to manufacture the same drugs for a mere fraction of the price, but the WTO outlawed this through the 1995 TRIPS agreement to protect Big Pharma’s monopoly.

It was not until 2003 that the WTO bowed to activist pressure and allowed southern Africa to import generics, but by then it was too late – HIV prevalence had already reached devastating proportions. In other words, much of the region’s AIDS burden can be directly attributed to the WTO’s rules and the corporations that defended them. And they are set to strike again: the WTO will cut patent exemptions for poor countries after 2016.

This dearth of basic drugs has gone hand in hand with the general collapse of public health institutions. Structural adjustment and WTO trade policies have forced states to cut spending on hospitals and staff in order to repay odious debts to the West. Swaziland, ground-zero in the world of AIDS, has been hit hard by these cuts. When I last visited I found that many once-bustling clinics are now empty and dilapidated. Neoliberalism has systematically destroyed the first line of defence against AIDS.

The point I want to drive home is that the policies that deny poor people access to life-saving drugs and destroy public healthcare come from the same institutions and interests that helped create the conditions for HIV transmission in the first place.

"

@3 weeks ago with 8222 notes