"I’m definitely Pro-Selfie. I think that anybody who’s Anti-Selfie is really just a hater. Because, truthfully, why shouldn’t people take pictures of themselves ? When I’m on Instagram and I see that somebody took a picture of themselves, I’m like ‘Thank You’.
I don’t need to see a picture of the sky, the trees, plants. There’s only one you.
I could Google image search ‘the sky’ and I would probably see beautiful images to knock my socks off. But I can’t google, you know ‘what does my friend look like today?’
For you to be able to take a picture of yourself that you feel good enough about to share with the world - I think that’s a great thing"

(Source: damnthosebands, via pobody)

@1 week ago with 5898 notes

floozys:

i don’t care about straight girls who are afraid to cut their hair short in case they get called lesbians, i care about the fact that lesbians are being used as fucking insults 

(via lgbtlaughs)

@1 week ago with 52854 notes
@1 week ago with 73 notes
hallowshorror:

anotherlgbttumblr:

kp-ks:

Book Burning Memorial
'In the center of Bebelplatz, a glass window showing rows and rows of empty bookshelves. The memorial commemorates the night in 1933 when 20,000 “anti-German” books were burned here under the instigation of Goebbels. There's a plaque nearby that says something like “Where they burn books, they will also burn humans in the end.” '

Interesting but rarely mentioned: most of the content burned that night came from the Institut für Sexualwissenschaft (institute for the science of sex) headed by Magnus Hirschfeld. The institute and Hirshfeld himself were some of the first to openly campaign for the right to have sex with someone of the same gender, the right to transition if you did not identify with your birth sex and for the general acceptance of queer people. The team had already performed the first SRS operations in Germany and in addition, the institute advocated sex education, contraception, the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, and women’s emancipation. Photographs of the night of the book burning are plastered across history books world wide, but the queer movement that was destroyed that night often goes unmentioned.

reblogging again for that^

hallowshorror:

anotherlgbttumblr:

kp-ks:

Book Burning Memorial

'In the center of Bebelplatz, a glass window showing rows and rows of empty bookshelves. The memorial commemorates the night in 1933 when 20,000 “anti-German” books were burned here under the instigation of Goebbels. There's a plaque nearby that says something like “Where they burn books, they will also burn humans in the end.” '

Interesting but rarely mentioned: most of the content burned that night came from the Institut für Sexualwissenschaft (institute for the science of sex) headed by Magnus Hirschfeld. The institute and Hirshfeld himself were some of the first to openly campaign for the right to have sex with someone of the same gender, the right to transition if you did not identify with your birth sex and for the general acceptance of queer people. The team had already performed the first SRS operations in Germany and in addition, the institute advocated sex education, contraception, the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, and women’s emancipation.
Photographs of the night of the book burning are plastered across history books world wide, but the queer movement that was destroyed that night often goes unmentioned.

reblogging again for that^

(Source: Flickr / kca, via gtfothinspo)

@1 week ago with 110184 notes

"There’s certainly a much more casual attitude [in British stand-up] to nominally tasteless jokes about the sexual abuse of women on stage and in audiences than there was when I started. But whether that represents an across the board trend is really hard to say.

In the 1980s when what was called ‘alternative comedy’ started, one of the things that it was supposed to do was not be sexist, not make fun of people who were differently abled, not do racist stuff. All that’s survived of that is race has still remained a taboo. Everything else has crept back in.

A lot of it’s crept back in under the idea that there’s irony. That the comedian is holding up a mirror to society, showing us our prejudices by enacting them for money. So it has certainly changed.

You talked about Jimmy Carr and Frankie Boyle. What I think is difficult about them is that I think they both really, really like jokes, and that’s obviously a good thing for a comedian. But I think they both start with a punchline, and they work back to a setup. Neither of them seem to have a coherent worldview.

So what’s confusing about Frankie Boyle is one minute he’ll be making fun of a handicapped child; the next minute he’ll be doing something about the Israeli occupation of Palestine that seems to take some extreme left-wing position. Same with Jimmy Carr. There doesn’t seem to be a coherent position, so therefore you don’t know what you’re supposed to take as truth and what you’re supposed to take as irony.

And the reason there isn’t a coherent position is that it’s all about getting the laugh rather than about having a point of view or a consistent personality: their acts aren’t informed by a personality or a worldview.

That means they cut down really well into short slots on telly. They cut down really well into tweets. They cut down really well into being on some page in a lad’s mag. You could argue that’s the job of a professional comedian. Weirdly, if your act’s informed by a point of view it’s much harder to snip it up into things, because the stuff doesn’t exist in isolation.

What you’ve said of those people is true, but it’s not representative of all standup: I couldn’t remember a hundred unrelated jokes. I dunno how you do it. I wouldn’t be able to remember whether I was supposed to be a sick right-wing libertarian or an anarchist from one moment to the next. It’d be hard to know.

It seems like a lot of the targets that we’re picking on now are not necessarily people that need to be taken down a peg or two. Like Katie Price’s autistic child: I didn’t really notice him getting above himself, to be honest. So I think it’s gone a bit wrong somewhere, and I don’t know how that is. I don’t know how you deal with that, other than censorship. I don’t know if that’s necessarily the idea. You hope it will sort of be self-policing, but I don’t know.

This idea of ‘what’s allowed’ is a bit confusing at the moment, because I don’t know if comedians are necessarily respecting the licence they’ve been given at the moment.

I don’t think ‘it’s just a joke’ is any sort of defence, because a joke’s a really powerful thing. And it can really upset someone, and it can make 12,000 people laugh in a stadium and send home the person who’s made that joke, send them home with tens of thousands of pounds. So the idea ‘it’s just a joke’ is a bit of a cop-out I think. You really need to think about how to justify the thing that you said: and was it worth the offence it could cause?

This thing about rape jokes is the current hot potato in discussions about standup. I think it’s been a long time coming this, because in the ‘open spot’ level it’s a real kind of fallback position of a punchline, something about rape, and it’s really weird. It’s quite a powerful word if you thought about how people in the room might feel.

There’s a thing doing the rounds at the moment where we’re all being asked to sign up to never making a joke about rape. And I don’t really know what that means, because I understand the intention behind it, which is that comedians are being asked to consider whether this joke with the word ‘rape’ in it has really anything to say about the issue, and is it more upsetting than it’s worth to people in the room who will inevitably be present who will have been raped?

But on the other hand you can’t just put a blanket ban on it because there’s all sort of things—well, Sarah Silverman’s got a great joke about rape where she says: ‘Of course women don’t complain about rape jokes, they don’t even report actual rapes.’ And you can’t say she can’t do that joke, because that joke has something to say about the subject. So it’s a difficult thing.

But I do think people have to think more now because everything’s instantly broadcast. Even something that isn’t filmed can be decontextualised and put on a social network, and suddenly you can be pilloried for something that’s entirely decontextualised, that’s not even what you said, so I think people have to be a bit more careful. They probably always should have been, but now that’s thrown into sharper relief."

British writer and comedian Stewart Lee discusses the prevalence of rape jokes and “ironic” bigotry in comedy, the consequences of comedy without a worldview, the social function of comedy, and the increased importance of making jokes responsibly in a social media/soundbite culture, in an interview with Oxford Brookes University, May 2013.

Vital food for thought in light of the #CancelColbert controversy and white liberals’ inability to acknowledge Asian-American experiences with racism or accept critiques of Colbert’s brand of satire.

(via jamesleerwc)

(via color-me-damned)

@1 week ago with 251 notes
vipeur:

vipeur:

The sky is the most beautiful thing in the entire world, I am so thankful that I get to witness something so amazing. It’s colours more vibrant then you could ever imagine and yet you are staring right at it. It makes me so happy.


32k in a few days woahhhhh haha

vipeur:

vipeur:

The sky is the most beautiful thing in the entire world, I am so thankful that I get to witness something so amazing. It’s colours more vibrant then you could ever imagine and yet you are staring right at it. It makes me so happy.

32k in a few days woahhhhh haha

(via artvevo)

@1 week ago with 47001 notes

(Source: iraffiruse, via iamsavingmyself)

@1 week ago with 253493 notes

"You are personally responsible for becoming more ethical than the society you grew up in."

Eliezer Yudkowsky  (via rampias)

Being a “product of their times” is no excuse. Never let someone off the hook for bigotry. 

(via callingoutbigotry)

(Source: abundance-mine, via samanticshift)

@1 week ago with 131031 notes

jimtheviking:

morganbaskinto:

#YesAllWomen because this is just a small sample of what I get to my PROFESSIONAL email and Facebook accounts. 

Just a reminder to all of you that this woman is running for Mayor of Toronto.  She is looking to be, arguably, the third most powerful politician in Ontario, and this is the shit she gets.

(via a-ghra-geal)

@1 week ago with 38944 notes

"

Socialized health care might work in Europe— I don’t know— but it wouldn’t work [in the US] because we’re not all-white like they are. We have black people here.

"

Sophomore Biology Major

Also, upon pointing out that Europe isn’t homogeneous and that race should have no effect on health care, I was told that I was just being racist. 

(Source: shitrichcollegekidssay)

@1 week ago with 370 notes

"“Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different. The good poet welds his theft into a whole of feeling which is unique, utterly different from that from which it was torn; the bad poet throws it into something which has no cohesion.”
— T.S. Eliot"

@1 week ago with 6 notes

(Source: peonyromance, via loveyourchaos)

@1 week ago with 16224 notes

nevver:

On the edge of experience, Wanda Koop

(Source: wandakoop.com, via cellulitisplayerhater)

@1 week ago with 5169 notes

(Source: opencult, via a-ghra-geal)

@1 week ago with 531957 notes
tierradentro:

Born on this day (07/14/1862): Gustav Klimt.

“Love”, 1895.

tierradentro:

Born on this day (07/14/1862): Gustav Klimt.

Love”, 1895.

@1 week ago with 611 notes